10 Little Known Tips And Tricks To Use On Your IPhone Part 1

Whether you're new to the Mac world or have been an avid user for years, there are lots of little tricks and shortcuts many people don't know about that can make your experience with these devices more productive. It doesn't matter if you're running MacOS Catalina or a prior version of the operating system (though, you should download Catalina for a number of reasons) -- you can still do all of these simple things to stay organized and get more done on your MacBook Pro, MacBook Air, iMac or Mac Pro.

a close up of a computer: The 2019 MacBook Pro Sarah Tew/CNET© Provided by CBS Interactive Inc. The 2019 MacBook Pro Sarah Tew/CNET an open laptop computer sitting on top of a table© CNET

Here are 10 tips and tricks for things that you may not have known your Mac could do. 

Read more:MacOS Catalina review: Mac goes pro, makes iPad a partner

1. Turn your desktop folders into emoji

Make your desktop folder icons easier to differentiate (and just more fun) by turning each folder into the emoji of your choice. Here's how to do it: 

1. Create a folder on your desktop by clicking

File > New folder.

2. Do a Google Image search for the emoji you want (e.g. "heart emoji" or "star emoji").

3. Drag the image you want to your desktop.

4. Double-click the image to open it in Preview.

5. To make the image transparent, press the markup icon (it looks like a magic wand), click the background of the image so that a moving outline appears around it and click

Edit > Cut.

6. Click the markup icon again, and click and drag a box around the emoji. 

7. Click edit, select all. Press

Command + C.

8. Go back to the original folder you created on your desktop and right-click on it.

9. Click

Get Info

10. In the screen that pops up, click the blue folder icon and press

Command + V. You should see your emoji appear.

MacBook Air, Yoga C930, XPS 13: Best laptops and desktops for the holidays 2019

  • a laptop computer sitting on top of a wooden table: Convertibles like the Yoga C930 are more laptop than tablet, while the Surface Pro gives you a full tablet experience, but can also be used as a laptop with its keyboard cover. And unlike an iPad or Android tablet, you're getting a full desktop operating system. The keyboard and stylus are generally sold separately, but keep an eye out for great bundle deals this time of year.
  • an open laptop computer sitting on top of a table: The C930 is our go-to pick when someone asks for a recommendation on an ultraportable two-in-one. It's just awesome all the way around, and we mean that literally since it has 360-degree hinges to use it in multiple positions -- from laptop to tablet. Lenovo announced its replacement, the C940, at IFA 2019, which updates it with the latest Intel processor. It qualifies as an Intel Athena laptop, which means certain aspects of its performance are more phonelike. This also means there should be a price drop for the C930; it's already less than $1,000 direct from Lenovo.
  • a laptop computer sitting on top of a table: A great choice for anyone who needs to work from anywhere, this two-in-one has a thoughtful design, excellent component options and looooooong battery life.
  • a desk with a computer mouse on a table: Apple's little desktop is perfect for taking advantage of Apple's Arcade gaming and Apple TV Plus services as well as handling everyday tasks. You even get a year of the latter for free when you buy a Mini.
  • a laptop computer sitting on top of a wooden table: The midrange G5 15 hits the mark with an excellent price-to-performance ratio, build quality and design. Dell's G-series gaming laptops are cheaper than those from its Alienware division, but still capable of playing the latest AAA titles.
  • a close up of a computer: There are certainly less expensive Chromebooks out there, but spending a little more gets you a better experience now and down the road.
  • a laptop computer sitting on top of a table: This is our go-to recommendation for those in search of a MacOS laptop for everyday use. The Air was updated earlier in the year with Apple's True Tone display, new processors and a $100 price drop. As Apple's most affordable laptop starting at $1,099, it's not exactly a bargain and you can get a lot more computer for you money if you go with Windows. However, the Air is frequently discounted for the holidays and last year's model is still a good choice and available for less.
  • a close up of a computer: Dell's XPS 13 is a 13.3-inch laptop that's so trimmed up that the body is basically the size of an older 11.6-inch laptop. Being part of the company's XPS line means both its chassis and components are top notch for its class, so you're getting great battery life and performance, too.
  • a desktop computer sitting on top of a desk: Just like its laptop equivalent, the Dell G5 desktop offers a lot of gaming performance in a compact design. It's available in a variety of configurations starting below $650. Unlike a laptop, though, you can upgrade or add components down the road.
  • a desktop computer monitor sitting on top of a desk: All-in-one PCs are great if you want a single computer for the entire family to use. The space-saving design makes set up easy and they come in a wide variety of sizes and configurations. HP's Envy is one of our favorites: It performs well for a wide variety of tasks and looks like furniture more than a desktop. If it's more than you need, though, HP offers a wide variety of attractive AIO models starting as low as $330.
>Full screen1/10 SLIDES © Provided by CBS Interactive Inc.
Convertibles like the Yoga C930 are more laptop than tablet, while the Surface Pro gives you a full tablet experience, but can also be used as a laptop with its keyboard cover. And unlike an iPad or Android tablet, you're getting a full desktop operating system. The keyboard and stylus are generally sold separately, but keep an eye out for great bundle deals this time of year.
2/10 SLIDES © Provided by CBS Interactive Inc.
The C930 is our go-to pick when someone asks for a recommendation on an ultraportable two-in-one. It's just awesome all the way around, and we mean that literally since it has 360-degree hinges to use it in multiple positions -- from laptop to tablet. Lenovo announced its replacement, the C940, at IFA 2019, which updates it with the latest Intel processor. It qualifies as an Intel Athena laptop, which means certain aspects of its performance are more phonelike. This also means there should be a price drop for the C930; it's already less than $1,000 direct from Lenovo.
3/10 SLIDES © Provided by CBS Interactive Inc.
A great choice for anyone who needs to work from anywhere, this two-in-one has a thoughtful design, excellent component options and looooooong battery life.
4/10 SLIDES © Provided by CBS Interactive Inc.
Apple's little desktop is perfect for taking advantage of Apple's Arcade gaming and Apple TV Plus services as well as handling everyday tasks. You even get a year of the latter for free when you buy a Mini.
5/10 SLIDES © Provided by CBS Interactive Inc.
The midrange G5 15 hits the mark with an excellent price-to-performance ratio, build quality and design. Dell's G-series gaming laptops are cheaper than those from its Alienware division, but still capable of playing the latest AAA titles.
6/10 SLIDES © Provided by CBS Interactive Inc.
There are certainly less expensive Chromebooks out there, but spending a little more gets you a better experience now and down the road.
7/10 SLIDES © Provided by CBS Interactive Inc.
This is our go-to recommendation for those in search of a MacOS laptop for everyday use. The Air was updated earlier in the year with Apple's True Tone display, new processors and a $100 price drop. As Apple's most affordable laptop starting at $1,099, it's not exactly a bargain and you can get a lot more computer for you money if you go with Windows. However, the Air is frequently discounted for the holidays and last year's model is still a good choice and available for less.
8/10 SLIDES © Provided by CBS Interactive Inc.
Dell's XPS 13 is a 13.3-inch laptop that's so trimmed up that the body is basically the size of an older 11.6-inch laptop. Being part of the company's XPS line means both its chassis and components are top notch for its class, so you're getting great battery life and performance, too.
9/10 SLIDES © Provided by CBS Interactive Inc.
Just like its laptop equivalent, the Dell G5 desktop offers a lot of gaming performance in a compact design. It's available in a variety of configurations starting below $650. Unlike a laptop, though, you can upgrade or add components down the road.
10/10 SLIDES © Provided by CBS Interactive Inc.
All-in-one PCs are great if you want a single computer for the entire family to use. The space-saving design makes set up easy and they come in a wide variety of sizes and configurations. HP's Envy is one of our favorites: It performs well for a wide variety of tasks and looks like furniture more than a desktop. If it's more than you need, though, HP offers a wide variety of attractive AIO models starting as low as $330.
10/10 SLIDES

2. Bypass and reset your password when you get locked out

Forgot your Mac password? Don't worry -- MacOS has two built-in, easy ways to log back into your Mac

Recovery Mode:

1. Turn off your Mac.

2. Press and hold

Command + R, and then press the power button. Hold in Command + R until you see a progress bar appear below the Apple logo on the screen. Your Mac will now be in Recovery Mode.

3. In the menu bar, click

Utilities > Terminal. A window will pop up. Type "resetpassword" as one word, without quotes, and press Return. 

4. Close the Terminal windows and you will find the Reset Password Tool. You'll see a list of all user accounts on your Mac -- if you reset the password for your account, you'll have to set a new one for every other user, too.

Apple ID: 

1. After entering the wrong user password a few times, you might be asked if you want to reset it with your Apple ID. Or you can click the question mark icon in the password text field, followed by the arrive icon, to call up the same process.

2. Enter your Apple ID email address and password. A pop-up alert will let you know that a new keychain that stores your passwords will be created. Click OK. 

3. Follow the rest of the prompts to create a new password for your user account.

10 tips to make your Mac feel like new

  • a laptop computer sitting on top of a wooden table: The single biggest improvement you can make to an old MacBook is to upgrade its traditional spinning hard drive to a solid-state drive. You'll be shocked at not only how easy it is to swap in an SSD but also at the huge impact it has on performance. Follow Sharon Profis' instructions on how to upgrade your MacBook Pro with an SSD.
  • a hand holding a circuit board: While you have your MacBook opened to replace its hard drive, take the opportunity to add more memory. Like the replacing a hard drive, adding more memory is a straightforward, simple process. To start, you need to find the right type of memory for your specific MacBook model. The brand doesn't matter much, just be sure to buy the right amount, type, and speed. Apple has a handy support page that shows the memory specifications for a variety of models, along with an illustrated guide to replacing the memory. Or you can follow our step-by-step guide to add more memory to a MacBook Pro.
  • a screenshot of a cell phone: If your Mac is slow to boot up, the problem may be that there are too many applications to open at startup. It's likely you never set them to launch at startup -- they launch by default. Go to System Preferences > Users & Groups and then click on the Login Items tab to see a list of the apps that open when you boot your Mac. Highlight the apps you don't want to open at startup and click the minus-sign button below the list of apps.
  • a screenshot of a cell phone: With a hard drive near full capacity, any computer will begin to slow down. To see how much space you have left on your Mac's drive, click on the Apple button in the upper-left corner and click About This Mac. Next, click on the Storage tab to view how much free space remains.OS X lacks a an uninstall program and if you simply drag an application to the trash, you'll remove the main file for the app but will leave behind many associated files that got installed along with the app. Time for a third-party uninstaller; I like AppCleaner to completely uninstall Mac apps.
  • a screenshot of a cell phone: If your Mac acts like it needs a nap every afternoon, when you are at the height of multitasking, there is an easy way to see which of your open applications is using the most system resources. Open the Activity Monitor. Click on the CPU tab to see which apps are occupying the most system resources. If you see Chrome at the top of the list, for example, then maybe it's time to switch to Safari.
  • a screenshot of a cell phone: OS X has a number of animations and transparency effects that add a bit of visual flair. This flair, however, taxes the graphics subsystem of older Macs and can adversely affect performance. You won't see much of a difference on newer Macs, but there are two settings to disable that might add a little pep in an old Mac's step.Go to System Preferences > Accessibility and choose Display from the left panel. Check the box for Reduce transparency.Next, go to Go to System Preferences > Dock and for Minimize windows using, choose Scale effect instead of Genie effect. Windows will now appear to open faster without the genie-springing-forth-from-a-bottle effect. You can also uncheck the box for Animate opening applications to stop app icons from bouncing in the Dock as apps open.
  • a screenshot of a cell phone: When you install an app on your Mac, the piece of software arrives as part of a package of files, including permissions that tell OS X which users can do what things with specific files. Over time, these permissions can get changed, resulting in your Mac slowing down. Repairing these disk permissions, in the most basic terms, amounts to reshuffling and re-dealing these permissions so that they return to their rightful place. To address this, OS X has a built-in tool called Disk Utility that does just the trick.Open Disk Utility, select your hard drive from the left panel, click the First Aid button and then click Run to repair your hard drive.
  • a screenshot of a cell phone: By default, Finder loads the All My Files view. Finder will load faster if you let it show only a slice of your files. It'll still search all of you'll files, but the Finder window will be quicker to open if you choose a folder for it to display.Open Finder and then go to Finder > Preferences. For New Finder windows show, choose another folder such as your home folder or the Desktop or Documents folder.
  • a screenshot of a cell phone: Powering your MacBook's display is the battery's biggest job. If you lower the brightness level, you'll get longer battery life. Open System Preferences and click Display. On the Display tab, you'll see a slider for Brightness. Lower it to a point between super bright and depressingly dull.There is another display-related setting on the Energy Saver area of System Preferences. Check the box for Slightly dim the display while on battery power. Keeping your display running while your laptop sits unattended is a needless waste of battery resources. On the Energy Saver page, you can set times for Computer Sleep and Display Sleep, both of which spring into action if your MacBook sits idle for a period of time. Set as short a time as you're comfortable with for the Battery tab; it's less important for the Power Adapter tab.
  • a screenshot of a cell phone: Apple releases new versions of OS X as free upgrades, so there is no reason not to stay current. New versions of OS X contain performance enhancements and security improvements to keep your Mac running smoothly and safely. Check in periodically with the Updates tab of the Mac App Store for OS X updates, and don't ignore notifications of updates that are ready to install. Alternatively, click About This Mac from the Apple menu and click the Software Update button to open the Mac App Store and check for updates.
>Full screen1/10 SLIDES © Provided by CNET
The single biggest improvement you can make to an old MacBook is to upgrade its traditional spinning hard drive to a solid-state drive. You'll be shocked at not only how easy it is to swap in an SSD but also at the huge impact it has on performance. Follow Sharon Profis' instructions on how to upgrade your MacBook Pro with an SSD.
2/10 SLIDES © Provided by CNET
While you have your MacBook opened to replace its hard drive, take the opportunity to add more memory. Like the replacing a hard drive, adding more memory is a straightforward, simple process. To start, you need to find the right type of memory for your specific MacBook model. The brand doesn't matter much, just be sure to buy the right amount, type, and speed. Apple has a handy support page that shows the memory specifications for a variety of models, along with an illustrated guide to replacing the memory. Or you can follow our step-by-step guide to add more memory to a MacBook Pro.
3/10 SLIDES © Provided by CNET
If your Mac is slow to boot up, the problem may be that there are too many applications to open at startup. It's likely you never set them to launch at startup -- they launch by default. Go to System Preferences > Users & Groups and then click on the Login Items tab to see a list of the apps that open when you boot your Mac. Highlight the apps you don't want to open at startup and click the minus-sign button below the list of apps.
4/10 SLIDES © Provided by CNET
With a hard drive near full capacity, any computer will begin to slow down. To see how much space you have left on your Mac's drive, click on the Apple button in the upper-left corner and click About This Mac. Next, click on the Storage tab to view how much free space remains.OS X lacks a an uninstall program and if you simply drag an application to the trash, you'll remove the main file for the app but will leave behind many associated files that got installed along with the app. Time for a third-party uninstaller; I like AppCleaner to completely uninstall Mac apps.
5/10 SLIDES © Provided by CNET
If your Mac acts like it needs a nap every afternoon, when you are at the height of multitasking, there is an easy way to see which of your open applications is using the most system resources. Open the Activity Monitor. Click on the CPU tab to see which apps are occupying the most system resources. If you see Chrome at the top of the list, for example, then maybe it's time to switch to Safari.
6/10 SLIDES © Provided by CNET
OS X has a number of animations and transparency effects that add a bit of visual flair. This flair, however, taxes the graphics subsystem of older Macs and can adversely affect performance. You won't see much of a difference on newer Macs, but there are two settings to disable that might add a little pep in an old Mac's step.Go to System Preferences > Accessibility and choose Display from the left panel. Check the box for Reduce transparency.Next, go to Go to System Preferences > Dock and for Minimize windows using, choose Scale effect instead of Genie effect. Windows will now appear to open faster without the genie-springing-forth-from-a-bottle effect. You can also uncheck the box for Animate opening applications to stop app icons from bouncing in the Dock as apps open.
7/10 SLIDES © Provided by CNET
When you install an app on your Mac, the piece of software arrives as part of a package of files, including permissions that tell OS X which users can do what things with specific files. Over time, these permissions can get changed, resulting in your Mac slowing down. Repairing these disk permissions, in the most basic terms, amounts to reshuffling and re-dealing these permissions so that they return to their rightful place. To address this, OS X has a built-in tool called Disk Utility that does just the trick.Open Disk Utility, select your hard drive from the left panel, click the First Aid button and then click Run to repair your hard drive.
8/10 SLIDES © Provided by CNET
By default, Finder loads the All My Files view. Finder will load faster if you let it show only a slice of your files. It'll still search all of you'll files, but the Finder window will be quicker to open if you choose a folder for it to display.Open Finder and then go to Finder > Preferences. For New Finder windows show, choose another folder such as your home folder or the Desktop or Documents folder.
9/10 SLIDES © Provided by CNET
Powering your MacBook's display is the battery's biggest job. If you lower the brightness level, you'll get longer battery life. Open System Preferences and click Display. On the Display tab, you'll see a slider for Brightness. Lower it to a point between super bright and depressingly dull.There is another display-related setting on the Energy Saver area of System Preferences. Check the box for Slightly dim the display while on battery power. Keeping your display running while your laptop sits unattended is a needless waste of battery resources. On the Energy Saver page, you can set times for Computer Sleep and Display Sleep, both of which spring into action if your MacBook sits idle for a period of time. Set as short a time as you're comfortable with for the Battery tab; it's less important for the Power Adapter tab.
10/10 SLIDES © Provided by CNET
Apple releases new versions of OS X as free upgrades, so there is no reason not to stay current. New versions of OS X contain performance enhancements and security improvements to keep your Mac running smoothly and safely. Check in periodically with the Updates tab of the Mac App Store for OS X updates, and don't ignore notifications of updates that are ready to install. Alternatively, click About This Mac from the Apple menu and click the Software Update button to open the Mac App Store and check for updates.
10/10 SLIDES

3. Do calculations and currency conversions in Spotlight

Spotlight is one of the more underrated Mac features -- when you know how to use it, it's a useful tool for getting around your computer faster, and without using a mouse. For example, you can use Spotlight as a calculator and to convert currency. 

To open Spotlight, click the magnifying glass icon at the top left of the menu bar, or tap

Command + Space bar on your keyboard. To use it as a calculator, simply type what you want to calculate into the search bar (for example, "919+1246/2") and the answer will appear as the search result, which you can copy and paste. 

To use Spotlight as a currency converter, type the amount you'd like to convert, with its currency symbol (for example, $100 or £100) and the search results will bring up conversion rates in different currencies, with data drawn from Yahoo. 

Read more: 12 Mac search tips from a Spotlight addict

4. Sign documents in the Preview or Mail app 

If you're emailed a PDF to sign, you don't have to go through the tedious process of printing it out, signing it and scanning it back in -- your Mac allows you to sign documents directly on your device in the Preview or Mail app. 

You can do this a number of different ways in different apps and programs, including saving a scanned copy of your signature on a piece of white paper and adding it in as an image in a given document. However, if you are working in the Mail app here's what to do: 

1. Drag the PDF into a email message, hover over the PDF, click the button with a down arrow at the top right and click

Markup

2. Click the box at the top that looks like a signature. 

3. Click

Trackpad to sign your name with your mouse on the trackpad, or click

Camera sign your name on white paper and take a photo of it with your computer's webcam. You can also save a signature to reuse. 

5. Type emoji from your keyboard 

Emoji aren't only for texts on your phone. In almost any web page or app (including Google Docs and Microsoft Word), go to the menu bar and click

Edit > Emoji & Symbols. A box with emoji will appear, and you can add any to the page you're working on. Or, you can use a keyboard shortcut:

Control + Command + Space

Apple Mac Pro: Expensive, sleek and definitely not for grating cheese

  • a man sitting in a box: Apple has debuted the new Mac Pro -- a dramatically retooled version of its flagship desktop computer that had not been significantly updated since 2013 -- on Monday at WWDC. It will be available starting in the fall.
  • a group of people sitting in front of a laptop computer: The new $5,999 entry-level configuration features an eight-core Xeon processor, 32GB of RAM, a Radeon Pro 580X graphics card and a 256GB SSD, and will start shipping in the fall.
  • a desktop computer sitting on top of a desk: However, higher-end configurations of the 2019 Mac Pro feature some new and very heavy duty components. They include a new Radeon Pro Vega II graphics processor and a specialized graphics card, Apple Afterburner, that can process more than 6 billion pixels per second.
  • The device has a stainless steel frame that offers 360-degree interior access.
  • a close up of electronics: There's up to 28-core Intel Xeon with 300 watts of power, up to 1.5TB of system memory and eight PCIe expansion slots.
  • a screen shot of a computer: In addition to the new computer, Apple also announced a new 6K Retina display.
  • a close up of a black background: The new model looks more like the company's previous
  • a close up of a typewriter: The 2019 version features a stainless steel frame and aluminum case that, when removed, provides unfettered access to the Mac Pro's interior.
  • a close up of a device: That makes the new Mac Pro distinct from most modern Apple devices, which are designed to be upgraded rather than easily modified (or repaired).
  • a screen shot of a computer: A few more looks at the "cheese grater" design of the Mac Pro.
  • a close up of a door
  • Tim Cook holding a wine glass: The new Mac Pro is easily the most powerful computer Apple has ever sold, and will compete with high-end Windows-based PCs optimized for handling hardcore video editing and multimedia applications. For more information, check out the Mac Pro's full specs here.
>Full screen1/14 SLIDES © Provided by CBS Interactive Inc.
Apple has debuted the new Mac Pro -- a dramatically retooled version of its flagship desktop computer that had not been significantly updated since 2013 -- on Monday at WWDC. It will be available starting in the fall.
2/14 SLIDES © Provided by CBS Interactive Inc.
The new $5,999 entry-level configuration features an eight-core Xeon processor, 32GB of RAM, a Radeon Pro 580X graphics card and a 256GB SSD, and will start shipping in the fall.
3/14 SLIDES © Provided by CBS Interactive Inc.
However, higher-end configurations of the 2019 Mac Pro feature some new and very heavy duty components. They include a new Radeon Pro Vega II graphics processor and a specialized graphics card, Apple Afterburner, that can process more than 6 billion pixels per second.
4/14 SLIDES © Provided by CBS Interactive Inc.
The device has a stainless steel frame that offers 360-degree interior access.
5/14 SLIDES © Provided by CBS Interactive Inc.
There's up to 28-core Intel Xeon with 300 watts of power, up to 1.5TB of system memory and eight PCIe expansion slots.
6/14 SLIDES © Provided by CBS Interactive Inc.
In addition to the new computer, Apple also announced a new 6K Retina display.
7/14 SLIDES © Provided by CBS Interactive Inc.
The new model looks more like the company's previous "cheese grater" design, which offers far greater customizability than the "trash can" aesthetic of the 2013 Mac Pro.
8/14 SLIDES © Provided by CBS Interactive Inc.
The 2019 version features a stainless steel frame and aluminum case that, when removed, provides unfettered access to the Mac Pro's interior.
9/14 SLIDES © Provided by CBS Interactive Inc.
That makes the new Mac Pro distinct from most modern Apple devices, which are designed to be upgraded rather than easily modified (or repaired).
10/14 SLIDES © Provided by CBS Interactive Inc.
A few more looks at the "cheese grater" design of the Mac Pro.
11/14 SLIDES © Provided by CBS Interactive Inc.
12/14 SLIDES © Provided by CBS Interactive Inc.
13/14 SLIDES © Provided by CBS Interactive Inc.
14/14 SLIDES © Provided by CBS Interactive Inc.
The new Mac Pro is easily the most powerful computer Apple has ever sold, and will compete with high-end Windows-based PCs optimized for handling hardcore video editing and multimedia applications. For more information, check out the Mac Pro's full specs here.
14/14 SLIDES

6. Use Split View to see two apps side by side, without resizing

With Split View, your Mac allows you to work in two apps side by side without having to resize them, and without the distraction of other apps. 

1. In MacOS Catalina , go to the upper left corner of a window, and either hover your mouse over or click and hold the green full-screen button. 

2. Choose

Tile Window to Left of Screen or

Tile Window to Right of Screen from the menu, and the window will fill that side of the screen. In past versions of MacOS (you need OS X El Capitan or later to use Split View), click and hold the green full-screen button, and drag the window to the left or right of the screen to tile it. 

3. To get out of split screen, hit the

Esc key on your keyboard. 

Read more:10 Mac apps everyone should be using

7. Create a keyboard shortcut for anything you want

You're probably familiar with the Mac keyboard shortcuts Apple uses, like

Command+C to copy text and

Command+V to paste it. But you can also create your own shortcut to access any menu option you like. 

1. Go to

System Preferences > Keyboard > Shortcuts > App Shortcuts, and click the

+ icon. 

2. A box will pop up allowing you to choose the application you want, the name of the menu command and the keyboard shortcut of your choice.

3. After you're done, tap

Add

8. Make volume adjustments more granular 

Sometimes the difference between each volume step on your Mac is larger than you think it will be, and your music, video or podcast goes from too quiet to too loud in one tap. If you want to make the volume increments smaller, hold down

Option+the up arrow as you hit the increase or decrease volume key. This will bring up the Sound box, which will let you adjust the volume in a more granular way. 

9. Rename a group of files at the same time

You don't have to individually rename a bunch of files or photos on your Mac. Instead, go to Finder and select the group of documents or photos you want to rename by clicking one, holding down Shift and clicking the others. Right-click, and scroll down to the option that says

Rename X items. Or, after selecting them, click the cog icon and click

Rename X items from there. Then, you'll be able to add text, replace text or apply a format like "Sarah's birthday party" with a number for each photo. 

10. Hide or customize the menu bar

Don't want to see the Menu bar on your Mac unless you need it? Go to

System Preferences > General, and click

Automatically hide and show the menu bar.    

If you want to keep your Menu bar and customize it, you can hold Command and drag the icons into different places, or remove them all together. 

For more, check out MacOS Catalina's iPad apps for the Mac are here, but the story is just getting started

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