Dad Of Five Left Dying Of Cancer On Short Stay Ward For Weeks In So Much Pain His Wife Couldn't Hold His Hand

Keith Rumley was given painkillers when he visited his GP with back pain

  • He was eventually admitted to hospital when his health deteriorated 

     

  • His family claim they were left in the dark about his cancer until his death

  • Grimsby's Diana, Princess of Wales Hospital said the correct care was given 

  • By Vanessa Chalmers Health Reporter For Mailonline

    Published: | Updated: 11:05 BST, 16 September 2019

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    The family of a fisherman who was in hospital dying of cancer for weeks were not told about his diagnosis until after his death.  

    Keith Rumley, of Grimsby, had first visited his GP in July 2018 with back pain and was given painkillers on repeated visits.

    He was eventually admitted to hospital, where scans revealed he had a metastatic adenocarcinoma. 

    But his family claim they were kept in the dark while they visited his bedside until his death certificate revealed the diagnosis. 

    Father-of-five Mr Rumley was in so much pain he was unable to speak or even hold his wife's hand in his final few days. 

    The hospital, Grimsby's Diana, Princess of Wales Hospital, said an investigation found the correct care was given.

    Keith Rumley was left on a short-stay ward dying of cancer for weeks, while his family were not told about his diagnosis until after his death

    Keith Rumley was left on a short-stay ward dying of cancer for weeks, while his family were not told about his diagnosis until after his death

    Wife Susan Rumley was unable to hold her husband's hand in his last days because he was in so much pain. She says doctors denied he had cancer

    Wife Susan Rumley was unable to hold her husband's hand in his last days because he was in so much pain. She says doctors denied he had cancer 

    Mr Rumley's wife Susan said: 'He was left there, in a bed, for four solid weeks seeing doctor after doctor. 

    'After a week he wasn't awake, wasn't talking, wasn't eating and had to be forced to drink. 

    'It got to the stage that, if I even touched his hand, he'd say to me "please let go of my hand". I'd ask why, and he'd say "Because it hurts. Please don't touch me".

    'I felt for him because his dignity was taken away. He wasn't there anymore.'  

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