How Fundraisers Convinced Conservatives To Donate $10 Million — Then Kept Almost All Of It.

(Mike Segar / Reuters)

BILL DE BLASIO

Who is he?

The mayor of New York City.

Is he running?

Yes. He announced on May 16.

Why does he want to run?

De Blasio was the harbinger of the Democratic Party’s leftward shift on economic issues, and they’d be at the center of his campaign, though the movement seems to have left him behind.

Who wants him to run?

That’s precisely the problem. De Blasio’s term as mayor has been a little bumpy, and even his friends and allies have spoken out against a run, publicly and privately.

Can he win the nomination?

No.

What else do we know?

De Blasio is the tallest candidate since Bill Bradley, in 2000. Both men are 6 foot 5.


(Matthew Brown / AP)

STEVE BULLOCK

Who is he?

Bullock is the governor of Montana, where he won reelection in 2016 even as Donald Trump won the state.

Is he running?

Yes. Bullock launched his campaign on May 14.

Why does he want to run?

Bullock portrays himself as a candidate who can win in Trump country and get things done across the aisle. He’s also been an outspoken advocate of campaign-finance reform.

Who wants him to run?

Unclear. The Great Plains and Mountain West aren’t traditional bases for national Democrats.

Can he win the nomination?

Probably not—and missing the cut for the first primary debate doesn’t help.


(Samantha Sais / Reuters)

MICHAEL BENNET

Who is he?

The Coloradan was appointed to the Senate in 2009 and has since won reelection twice.

Is he running?

Yes. Bennet announced his campaign on May 2.

Why does he want to run?

Like his fellow Rocky Mountain State Democrat John Hickenlooper, Bennet presents himself as someone with experience in business and management who knows how to work with Republicans.

Who wants him to run?

Probably some of the same people who wanted Hickenlooper to run. Bennet gained new fans with a viral video of his impassioned rant about Ted Cruz during the January government shutdown.

Can he win?

No.


(Jeff Roberson / AP)

JOE BIDEN

Who is he?

Don’t play coy. You know the former vice president, senator from Delaware, and recurring >Onion character.

Is he running?

Yes. After a long series of hesitations, Biden announced his campaign on April 25.

Why does he want to run?

Biden has wanted to be president since roughly forever, and he thinks he might be the best bet to win back blue-collar voters and defeat President Trump in 2020. (Trump reportedly agrees.) But Biden seems reluctant to end his career with a primary loss, knows he’s old (he’ll turn 78 right after Election Day 2020), and is possibly out of step with the new Democratic Party.

Who wants him to run?

Biden has established a strong lead in the Democratic primary, but his shaky performance in the first debate showed he’s not invincible.

Can he win the nomination?

Yes. Being Barack Obama’s vice president gave Biden a fresh glow, but his past policy stands and his tendency toward handsiness remain a challenge. We’ve also seen him run for president twice before, and not very effectively.


(Brian Snyder / Reuters)

SETH MOULTON

Who is he?

A third-term congressman from Massachusetts, Moulton graduated from Harvard, then served in the Marines in Iraq.

Is he running?

Yes. He announced his campaign on April 22.

Why does he want to run?

In an interview with >BuzzFeed, he said he felt the Democratic Party needs younger leaders and, alluding to his military career, “someone … for whom standing up to a bully like Donald Trump isn’t the biggest challenge he or she has ever faced in life.”

Who wants him to run?

That’s not clear. With his sparkling résumé and movie-star looks, Moulton has grabbed a lot of attention, but he doesn’t have an obviously strong constituency, and a rebellion against Nancy Pelosi’s leadership after the 2018 election fizzled.

Can he win?

No.


(Jonathan Bachman / Reuters)

TIM RYAN

Who is he?

The Ohioan is a member of the House, representing Youngstown and America’s greatest city, Akron.

Is he running?

Yes. Ryan announced his plan to run on The View on April 4.

Why does he want to run?

Ryan is a classic Rust Belt Democrat and friend of labor, and he’s concerned about the fate of manufacturing. He is also an outspoken critic of Democratic leadership, mounting a quixotic challenge to Nancy Pelosi in 2017.

Who wants him to run?

Ryan comes from a part of Ohio that traditionally votes Democratic but swung to Trump, and he’d have supporters there.

Can he win the nomination?

Deeply unlikely. Ryan had a very shaky night at the first debate.

What else do we know?

He’s big on meditation.


(mary Altaffer / AP)

KIRSTEN GILLIBRAND

Who is she?

Gillibrand has been a senator from New York since 2009, replacing Hillary Clinton. Before that, she served in the U.S. House.

Is she running?

Yes. She launched her campaign officially on March 17.

Why does she want to run?

Gillibrand has emphasized women’s issues, ranging from sexual harassment in the military and more recent #MeToo stories to equal pay, and her role as a mom is central in her announcement video. Once a fairly conservative Democrat, she has moved left in recent years.

Who wants her to run?

Gillibrand could have fairly broad appeal among mainstream Democratic voters, and she hopes that her time representing upstate New York gives her an advantage with nonurban voters. She has, however, earned the enmity of the Clinton world for her criticisms of Bill.

Can she win the nomination?

Probably not. Her campaign hasn’t managed to gain much traction thus far.

What else do we know?

Just like you, she hated the >Game of Thrones finale and is mad online about it.