Local Church Brings Ash Wednesday To The Streets

COURTESY USGS

Fissure 8 was still active and effusing voluminous lava Friday morning. Fountains were contained within the cone, with limited bursts sending spatter onto the side sides.

  • COURTESY USGS

    Fissure 8 continued building a tephra cone, today, and producing robust channelized lava in Kilauea Volcano’s Lower East Rift Zone.

  • CINDY ELLEN RUSSELL / CRUSSELL@STARADVERTISER.COM

    Fissure 8 continued to pump lava and steam nearby a home on Nohea St. in Leilani Estates on Wednesday.

  • CINDY ELLEN RUSSELL / CRUSSELL@STARADVERTISER.COM

    A resident gate remained intact, Wednesday, amongst the fallen trees and steaming lava field near fissure 8 at Nohea St. in Leilani Estates.

  • U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

    The view of Halemaumau crater at 5:50 a.m. Wednesday. A moderate quake was followed by another explosive eruption at the summit early this morning.

  • COURTESY USGS

    In this USGS photo released Wednesday, a geologist makes an early morning observation of the lava fountain and channelized flow at fissure 8 in Leilani Estates.

  • U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

    New land is formed by lava from Kilauea Volcano where the bay and village of Kapoho once stood. The new coastline, following the ragged lava-ocean interface, is approximately 1.3 miles long.

  • U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

    Fissure 8 lava fountains continued to reach heights of 130 to 150 feet Wednesday from within the growing cone of cinder and spatter, which was about 130 feet at its highest point.

  • ADVERTISING

    UPDATE: 10 a.m.

    Continuing trade wind conditions are expected to bring vog to the southern and western parts of Hawaii island. Vog and air quality conditions can be monitored online at vog.ivhhn.org

    Geologists observed incandescence from fissure 22 during an overflight this morning, the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory reported.

    Pele’s hair and other lightweight volcanic gas fragments from the lava fountain at fissure 8 continue to fall downwind of the fissure. High winds may carry lighter particles to greater distances.

    6 a.m.

    Fissure 8 continues to erupt with a full channel flowing to the ocean at Kapoho, according to the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory.

    Civil Defense is asking residents in the Volcano area to monitor utility connections of gas, electricity and water due to frequent earthquake activity.

    Vog and air quality conditions can be monitored online at vog.ivhhn.org

    Free medical, dental and eye care are available today at Keaau High School between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Tropic Care will also provide a free legal clinic today from 9 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. at Keaau High.

    Friday, 7 p.m.

    An explosive eruption at Kilauea summit has occurred at 6:52 p.m., the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory reports.

    On Twitter, the U.S. Geological Survey said an ash plume reached 500 feet above ground and drifted southwest. The energy released by the event was equivalent to a magnitude 5.3 earthquake.

    To protect yourself from ash fallout, stay indoors with the windows closed. If you’re driving, also keep your windows closed and take caution as ash fallout may cause limited visibility and slippery conditions.

    After the hazard has passed, check your catchment system for any impact that may affect your water quality.

    9:30 a.m.

    The latest count of homes destroyed is now at 614, according to the Hawaii County Civil Defense at a briefing this morning.

    Hawaiian Volcano Observatory reports that fissure 8 continues to erupt with a full channel flowing to the ocean at the Kapoho coastline, according to Hawaii County spokeswoman Janet Snyder. The U.S. Geological Survey has now seen “seeps of very, pasty lava” coming out at the Pohoiki junction, she said.

    Fissure 6 is no longer active, she said, but fissure 22, the one closest to the Puna Geothermal Venture, has become active, with fountaining.

    Tradewinds, meanwhile, are pushing vog to the southwest to Kau and expected to wrap around to Kona.

    RELATED STORIES

    >> Charter school co-founder looks to future after eruption

    >> Closed voting sites and early absentee ballots raise concerns in Puna

    >> Hula conference, chants to Pele coincide with the eruption

    >> Real estate loss from eruption approaches $400 million

    RELATED PHOTOS AND VIDEOS

    >> Live webcams from Hawaii island

    >> Lava on Moku Street in Leilani Estates, June 21

    >> Vigorous lava flow from fissure 8 to ocean, June 19

    >> Gas plume above Halemaumau Crater, June 18

    >> Hawaii National Guard lava river flyby, June 16

    >> Kalapana Night Market provides needed lava break for residents, June 16

    >> Newly opened center is a one-stop shop for Kilauea disaster survivors on Hawaii island, June 15

    >> Dramatic footage from Kilauea’s most active fissure: No. 8, June 15

    >> Pahoa business owners talk about drop in business, June 14

    COMPLETE KILAUEA COVERAGE

    >> Star-Advertiser volcano coverage

    >> Kilauea Volcano YouTube playlist

    There are no updates on the proposed, public viewing area, said Snyder, but officials are looking into it due to public demand, and scoping out possible sites. Public safety is the top concern.

    Residents of Hawaii County who suffered damage or losses from the recent Kilauea volcanic eruption and earthquakes can register for disaster assistance with the Federal Emergency Management Agency from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. daily at the Keaau High School Gym.

    FEMA, the U.S. Small Business Administration and state and county government agencies will be present at the center. The Tropic Care health clinic offering free medical, dental and eye care is also available from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Keaau High School today.

    If you need a ride, buses will be running from 7:30 a.m. to 9 p.m. between the two shelters and the Disaster Recovery Center.

    6:30 a.m.

    Although fissure 8 continues to erupt, filling the lava channel on the way to the ocean in Kapoho, trade winds have returned and are pushing vog to the southwest.

    The eruption presents no immediate threat, but residents should listen for be prepared for evacuation, the Hawaii County Civil Defense said.

    THURSDAY, JUNE 21

    4 p.m.

    Fissure 8 continues to erupt with a full channel flowing to the ocean at Kapoho, Hawaiian Volcano Observatory said today. Trade winds are pushing vog to the southwest.

    Highway 130 from Pahoa to Kalapana Road is open only to residents with official credentials. Pahoa-Kapoho Road between Highway 130 and Nanawale Boulevard is only open to residents with official credentials.

    Residents who suffered damage or losses from the Kilauea eruptions and earthquakes can register for disaster assistance with the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA):

    >> A Disaster Recovery Center (DRC) is open daily from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m., located at the Keaau High School Gym.

    >> FEMA, the U.S. Small Business Administration, and state and county government agencies will be present at the center.

    >> Buses will be running between the two shelters and the DRC between 7:30 a.m. and 9 p.m.

    Free medical, dental and eye care will be available Friday and Saturday at “Tropic Care 2018” at Keaau High School between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Free breakfast and lunch will be available for children.

    Tropic Care is open to everyone, whether or not they are affected by the Kilauea eruption.

    For more information, visit https://hilo.hawaii.edu/wellness/tropic-care-2018.php.

    1:55 p.m.

    An earthquake with a magnitude of 5.4 was recorded near the summit of Kilauea volcano this afternoon but did not generate a tsunami, according to officials with the Pacific Tsunami Warning Center on Oahu.

    The quake was recorded at about 1:13 p.m. and was “likely associated with a summit eruption,” they said.

    PTWC officials said the gas explosion at Halemaumau caused a blast wave that was not large enough to generate a tsunami.

    Hawaiian Volcano Observatory officials said the gas explosion at the summit resulted in a small ash plume that may affect surrounding areas.

    The seismic event was one of hundreds of magnitude 2.5 or higher earthquakes to rattle the Kilauea region over the last 24 hours, according to the U.S. Geological Survey.

    Noon

    PAHOA, Hawaii >> Lava pouring into Kapoho Bay has reached a depth of almost 200 feet, further indication of the high-volume output from fissure 8 in Lower Puna, where Kilauea began erupting anew May 3.

    As of Wednesday, lava had covered 370 acres of ocean off Kapoho, according to Mike Zoeller, a geologist with the Center for the Study of Active Volcanoes at the University of Hawaii at Hilo.

    Fissure 8 has proven such an effective conduit that is has stabilized volcanic activity in the lower East Rift Zone, nearly eliminating flows at other vents and lessening the risk of new ones opening, Zoeller said.

    “Right now we’re not seeing any real changes to that rate,” he said.

    The fissure also is producing 165- to 180-foot-high fountains at last report and feeding an 8-mile-long river of lava to the ocean.

    Meanwhile, tradewinds of 10 to 20 mph are pushing vog out of interior sections of Hawaii island and can be expected to gradually increase through the weekend, bringing additional rain, according to meteorologist Matthew Foster of the National Weather Service.

    Despite fissure 8’s starring role in the Kilauea eruption that has covered nearly 10 square miles, destroying 598 homes and displacing hundreds of residents, officials aren’t ready to consider giving it a more permanent place name, said U.S. Geological Survey spokeswoman Leslie Gordon.

    Kilauea’s Pu’u ‘O’o vent, which has been continuously erupting since 1983, was dubbed after consultation with Native Hawaiian elders, Gordon said.

    The federal Board of Geographic Names could take similar action with regard to fissure 8 upon request of the local community. Any name would be based on a recommendation from Native Hawaiians, she said.

    8:45 a.m.

    HILO >> Hawaii County Mayor Harry Kim checked out of the hospital and was at the Emergency Operations Center this morning.

    Kim surprised everyone by appearing in the middle of the morning briefing. He spoke to the team and was very encouraging, Hawaii County spokeswoman Janet Snyder said. A cabinet meeting is scheduled at 9 a.m. today to discuss the budget.

    “Most guys in his situation don’t work 10 hours a day,” said managing director Wil Okabe. “They slow down. Harry doesn’t do that. There’s only one Harry Kim.”

    The number of homes damaged by the Kilauea eruptions, meanwhile, has grown to 598.

    Hawaiian Volcano Observatory reports that Fissure 8 continues to erupt, with lava fountains of up to 187 feet and a full channel flowing to the ocean in one major entry at the Kapoho coastline. Fissures 6, 15 and 16 continue producing minor spattering. Trade winds are expected to return today, pushing vog to the southwest.

    The latest count of people registered with FEMA is at 1,015, who sought assistance online, by phone or in person at the Disaster Recovery Center.

    Additionally, the U.S. Small Business Administration has handled 381 federal disaster loans, which are available to small businesses as well as residents impacted by the disaster in Hawaii County as a result of President Donald Trump’s major disaster declaration for individual assistance.

    Hawaii County police and state conservation officers, meanwhile, have cited a total of 74 people for loitering in the East Rift Zone, according to state Department of Land and Natural Resources spokesman Dan Dennison.

    Snyder said it is confirmed that chronically homeless individuals are staying at the emergency shelters set up for Kilauea eruption evacuees, but that no one would be turned away.

    The DRC is open daily from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m., and at Keaau High School Gym. The state Health Department is holding a Volcanic Ash and Vog Community Meeting at 6 p.m. today at Waikoloa Elementary & Middle School Cafeteria.

    6:15 a.m.

    Fissure 8 continues to erupt, filling the lava channel on the way to the ocean in Kapoho.

    Fissures 6, 15 and 16 are producing minor spattering. Trade winds are expected to return today.

    As of Wednesday, 1,015 were registered with the Federal Emergency Management Agency for assistance and the Small Business Administration had handled 329 service requests from homeowners or businesses at the Disaster Recovery Center at the Keaau High School Gym.

    MORE KILAUEA COVERAGE

    >> Kilauea eruption has cost state, county more than $5.8M

    >> Lava output far outpaces previous eruptions

    >> Fifth world conference on hula underway in Hilo

    >> Council members anticipate special session over lava’s ramifications

    >> Despite reports, Kilauea eruption not causing gems to rain from sky

    >> For National Guard, lava disaster presents real-world mission

    >> Scientists monitoring renewed fissure activity

    >> Big Island disaster survivors flow into a FEMA aid center on opening day

    >> Moderate quake shakes Kilauea summit

    >> Congresswoman Hanabusa visits Hawaii island

    >> Kilauea eruption is classic example of ‘gentle’ volcano

    >> Ashfall, vog lowers air quality for residents of Ocean View

    >> Big Isle tourism campaign gets love in Ohio

    >> Kilauea isn’t Hawaii’s only active volcano

    >> Survivors of past Hawaii lava recall despair and opportunity

    >> Hundreds of animals among lava refugees

    >> Influx of new people has brought more crime, shelter residents say

    >> Helicopter mission allows widow to gather belongings before losing home to lava

    >> Opening viewing points might shore up Big Island’s visitor industry

    >> Kilauea eruption will fuel volcano research for years to come

    >> Photos, words fall short in describing volcano

    >> Prolonged papaya shortage expected in wake of volcanic activity


    The Associated Press contributed to this report.

    Ash plume from latest eruption reaches 500 feet, drifts southwest
    COLUMN: A common calling is the tie that binds
    ‘Wednesdays At The Park’ Brings Games, Food, Fun
    Local religion digest: Churches to join for community service and picnic in Mohnton park
    Local Briefs: June 23
    Award winning fireworks show and carnival returns to Carson City for July 4 holiday celebration
    Things to do on Tuesday around Carson City: Concerts, coloring, and canyon trails
    Faith notes: Local religious establishments plan yard sales, collect donations and more
    Town Crier: Wednesday's Highlights
    Church Calendar