Primary Takeaways: Women Keep Winning And A Trump Tweet Can Be Fatal

Voters head to the polls on June 12 to vote in primaries in South Carolina, Virginia, Maine, Nevada, and North Dakota, continuing the string of spring primaries in the United States.

(Pictured) A woman wears a sticker in multiple languages after voting in the primary election at a polling station in Los Angeles, on June 5, 2018. 

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Supporters of the ranked-choice voting system embrace outside their primary night rally, shortly after polls closed on June 12, in Portland, Maine. Maine voters didn't just select their favorite candidates; they ranked the candidates from first to last using the system for the first time in statewide primaries.
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A voter carries her ballot to the ballot box at the Hillsboro Old Stone School in Virginia's 10th Congressional district, Rep. Barbara Comstock's district, on primary election day on June 12, in Virginia.
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Cresent Hardy visits a Republican campaign office on June 12, in Las Vegas. Hardy is a Republican candidate for Nevada's 4th Congressional District.
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Kyle Bailey, a spokesman for the Committee for Ranked Choice Voting, smiles as he is interviewed at their primary night rally shortly after polls closed on June 12 in Portland, Maine. Maine voters didn't just select their favorite candidates, they ranked the candidates from first to last using the system for the first time in statewide primaries.
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A voter arrives at the Philomont, Va fire station in Virginia's on June 12.
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A sign of President Donald Trump is on display as volunteers work a phone bank at a Republican campaign office on June 12 in Las Vegas.
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Clark County Commission member and Democratic gubernatorial candidate Steve Sisolak leave a polling place after voting in a primary election on June 12 in Las Vegas.

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Clark County Commission member and Democratic gubernatorial candidate Chris Giunchigliani speaks with people after voting in a primary election on June 12, in Las Vegas.
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Susie Lee, left, shakes hands with Cathy Bostic while canvassing a neighborhood on the day of the primary election on June 12 in Henderson, Nev. Lee is a Democratic candidate for Nevada's 3rd Congressional District.
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Chris Klein, right, receives instructions on voting in the state primary and city elections at the downtown Fargo public library on June 12in Fargo, N.D. Election judges at the site said turnout was the lightest in years as fewer than 100 people at shown up by noon. There were few contested races for state and national positions.
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A voter fills out a ballot at a polling location during the primary election in Strasburg, Va., on Tuesday, June 12, 2018. In the Shenandoah Valley's 6th Congressional district, four Democrats are running in the primary for the open seat being vacated by retiring Republican Bob Goodlatte.

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Voters fill out ballots at a polling location during the primary election in Lebanon Church, Va., on Tuesday, June 12, 2018. In the Shenandoah Valley's 6th Congressional district, four Democrats are running in the primary for the open seat being vacated by retiring Republican Bob Goodlatte.

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A voter checks in at a polling location during the primary election in Lebanon Church, Va., on Tuesday, June 12, 2018. In the Shenandoah Valley's 6th Congressional district, four Democrats are running in the primary for the open seat being vacated by retiring Republican Bob Goodlatte.

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Maine Attorney General Janet Mills, left, who is one of seven Democrats facing off in a gubernatorial primary, greets voters outside a polling place, Tuesday, June 12, 2018, in Portland, Maine. The election is the first statewide primary to utilize ranked-choice voting.

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Election officials work at a polling location during the primary election in Lebanon Church, Va., on Tuesday, June 12, 2018. In the Shenandoah Valley's 6th Congressional district, four Democrats are running in the primary for the open seat being vacated by retiring Republican Bob Goodlatte.

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A "Vote Here!" sign stands outside a polling location during the primary election in Lebanon Church, Va., on Tuesday, June 12, 2018. In the Shenandoah Valley's 6th Congressional district, four Democrats are running in the primary for the open seat being vacated by retiring Republican Bob Goodlatte.

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People vote in a primary election at a polling station in Los Angeles, on June 5. Elections were held in several states across the U.S. on Tuesday.

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Dana Rohrabacher, Republican U.S. Senate candidate from California, speaks during a primary election watch party in Costa Mesa, Calif., on June 5. 
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Democratic Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom gestures next to his wife Jennifer Siebel Newsom after speaking at his gubernatorial campaign's primary night watch party on June 5 in San Francisco.

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People react as results come in after the California primaries at a post-election party held by the Los Angeles Democratic Party on June 5 in Los Angeles. 
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Republican gubernatorial candidate John Cox speaks at his election night headquarters after placing second in the California primary on June 5 in San Diego, California.
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Alabama Governor Kay Ivey cast her vote during the Alabama Primary election at Huntingdon College, on June 5 in Montgomery, Ala.
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A poll worker holds her dog as a voter marks her ballot at the Santa Monica Jeep polling station as Californians go to the polls in California's primary election in Santa Monica, California, on June 5, 2018.
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Retired state judge Russ Fagg, a candidate in Montana's Republican U.S. Senate primary, waves to drivers in a highway median, on June 5, 2018 in Billings, Mont. 
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Howard Sherman, Democratic candidate for his party's nomination for a U.S. Senate seat, right, and his wife, actress Sela Ward, left, converse with Clarence Bolls Sr., owner of Gloria's Family Restaurant, in Jackson, Miss., during a campaign working lunch, on June 5, 2018. 

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Election workers Heidi McGettigan, left, Margaret Wohlford, center, and David Jensen, unload a bag of ballots brought in from a polling precinct to the Sacramento County Registrar of Voters office, on June 5, 2018, in Sacramento, Calif.
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Resident Peter Brubaker, with his dog Albert, arrives to cast his vote at a polling station inside the First Christian Church in Torrance, Calif., on, June 5, 2018. 
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A voter casts her ballot at a Los Angeles County lifeguard headquarters at Venice Beach, on June 5, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. 
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Small U.S. flags flutter as voters arrive to cast their ballots during the Alabama primary election at Huntingdon College on June 5, 2018 in Montgomery, Ala. 
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Voters arrive to cast their ballots in the Alabama Primary election on June 5, 2018 in Montgomery, Ala. 
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Iowa Democratic Congressional candidate Cindy Axne fills in her ballot for the Iowa primary on June 5, 2018 in West Des Moines, Iowa. 
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Don Boyvey, of Des Moines, Iowa, casts his ballot in the Iowa primary, on June 5, 2018, in Des Moines, Iowa. 
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Gavin Newsom greets morning diners at The Serving Spoon Restaurant in Inglewood after meeting with Los Angeles County Supervisor Mark Ridley-Thomas for breakfast on June 4, 2018.
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Retired law professor Antoinette Sedillo Lopez, right, calls voters from her Albuquerque, N.M., headquarters on June 4, 2018, as she seeks last minute support for the Democratic nomination for an open Congressional seat in central New Mexico. 
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Georgia Democratic gubernatorial candidate Stacey Abrams smiles before speaking to supporters during an election-night watch party, on May 22 in Atlanta.
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Georgia Secretary of State Brian Kemp, a Republican primary candidate for governor, talks with supporters during an election night results party on May 22 in Athens, Ga.
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Republican Lt. Gov. Casey Cagle, a candidate for Georgia governor, speaks with supporters during an election-night watch party in Gainesville, Ga., on May 22.
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A man casts his electronic ballot at the Little Five Points polling precinct during voting in the Georgia midterm primary election day in Atlanta, on May 22. 
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Cindy Benton celebrates after voting in the Arkansas primary election on May 22 in Little Rock, Ark. The Democratic and Republican parties held elections Tuesday, while all registered voters were allowed to vote in judicial elections. 
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Kentucky 6th Congressional District Democratic candidate Amy McGrath, left, speaks with Vonnie Gesinske at RT Outfitters on May 21 in Lexington, Ky. McGrath is one of several candidates seeking the Democratic nomination in the primary election for the chance to challenge likely Republican nominee Andy Barr, a three-term incumbent.
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Campaign signs and political candidates greet visitors to the Pulaski County Courthouse Annex in Little Rock, Ark., for the end of the early voting period on May 21. Arkansas' primary and judicial general election occurs Tuesday, May 22, 2018. 
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U.S. Rep. Lou Barletta, R-Pa., Republican primary candidate for U.S. Senate, talks to supporters during an election night results party, Tuesday, May 15, in Hazleton, Pa. Barletta, a staunch supporter of President Donald Trump who first got national notice as a small-city mayor for his attempted crackdown on illegal immigration, on Tuesday won the Republican nomination for U.S. Senate in Pennsylvania.
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Democratic 2nd District House candidate Kara Eastman hugs her campaign manager Ben Onkka, in Omaha, Neb., Tuesday, May 15, as she holds a slim lead over Brad Ashford in the primary election. Omaha-area voters are set to pick a Democratic nominee Tuesday who will challenge U.S. Rep. Don Bacon, R-Neb., after the congressman claimed the seat from Democrats two years ago.
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Rep. Lou Barletta (R-Pa.) embraces a supporter upon arriving to cast his vote in the 2018 Pennsylvania Primary Election for U.S. Senator at the Hazleton Southside Fire Station polling station on May 15, 2018, in Hazleton, Pa.

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Democratic gubernatorial candidate Richard Cordray, left, and his running mate Betty Sutton greet a crowd of supporters during an election night event on May 8 in Columbus, Ohio. Republican Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine, one of the state’s best-known politicians, and Cordray, who headed the federal consumer protection bureau under President Barack Obama, prevailed to head into a fall face-off to succeed Republican Gov. John Kasich.
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John Hosted, Republican candidate for Lieutenant Governor, from left, his wife Tina, stand with Republican gubernatorial candidate Mike DeWine and his wife Fran at an a primary election night rally, on May 8 in Columbus, Ohio.
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Republican Senate candidate Mike Braun thanks supporters after winning the Republican primary in Whitestown, Ind., on May 8. Braun faced Todd Rokita and Luke Messer in the Republican Primary race. Braun advances to a November matchup with Democrat Joe Donnelly, who is considered one of the Senate's most vulnerable incumbents.
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Senate candidate Todd Rokita and his wife, Kathy, wave to supporters during an election night party, on May 8, in Indianapolis.
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A voter checks in before filling out a ballot at the Cincinnati Public Library precinct on Primary Day, on May 8 in Cincinnati. 
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Voters walk through a gauntlet of campaign volunteers at the Durham County Library North Regional in Durham, N.C., on May 8, 2018. 
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WASHINGTON — For Mark Sanford, the Republican Party looks a lot like the party of President Trump. 

The sitting Republican House member looked to be losing his race to state Rep. Katie Arrington, who campaigned as a Trump ally, after the president made a last-minute endorsement of Arrington. Sanford has been one of the few members to criticize the president, and GOP primary voters punished him for it, handing him his first electoral defeat. 

Some folks who were not feeling the sting of defeat? Women, particularly Democratic women, who won primary elections across the country.

And the effects of Maine's new voting system was still to be determined. Hours after the polls closed votes were still being tabulated. 

Here are some takeaways from Tuesday's primaries in South Carolina, Maine, North Dakota, Virginia and Nevada.

It's Trump’s party

Just three hours before the polls were supposed to close in South Carolina, Trump inserted himself into an already tight race between Sanford and Arrington. Trump said he endorsed Arrington over his party's incumbent lawmaker because Sanford — who has never hesitated to criticize the president — was “very unhelpful” and “nothing but trouble.” 

It was the first election loss for a politician who is no stranger to controversy. Sanford had to resign as governor in 2009 over an affair but won his House seat just a few years later. Arrington had been running as a Trump ally while highlighting Sanford's criticism of the president.

Sanford isn’t the only incumbent whose criticism of Trump hurt in the primary. Alabama Republican Rep. Martha Roby was forced into a runoff last week. She came under fierce fire in her GOP primary for withdrawing her endorsement of Trump in the 2016 presidential race after the "Access Hollywood" tape revealed Trump's boasts about grabbing women by the genitals without their consent. Roby's opponent, Bobby Bright, a one-time Democratic congressman, ran ads accusing Roby of turning “her back on President Trump when he needed her the most.” 

On the flip side, support from the president was not enough to keep South Carolina Gov. Henry McMaster from a runoff after he failed to secure over 50 percent of the vote, but it did have him leading by a significant margin. McMaster — who was an early endorser of the president’s — has gotten Trump’s blessing via Twitter.

a man and a woman looking at the camera: In this Wednesday, April 11, 2018 photo, Virginia State Sen. Jennifer Wexton, D-Loudon, center, talks with Sen. Scott Surovell, D-Fairfax, left, during the Senate special budget session at the Capitol in Richmond, Va. Wexton is one of the candidates in the crowded June Democratic primary that will produce a viable contender in the district representing northern Virginia suburbs and challenge Republican Barbara Comstock. © Steve Helber, AP In this Wednesday, April 11, 2018 photo, Virginia State Sen. Jennifer Wexton, D-Loudon, center, talks with Sen. Scott Surovell, D-Fairfax, left, during the Senate special budget session at the Capitol in Richmond, Va. Wexton is one of the candidates in the crowded June Democratic primary that will produce a viable contender in the district representing northern Virginia suburbs and challenge Republican Barbara Comstock.

Women — especially Dems — keep winning

In almost every race where a women ran in Virginia she won. Democratic women won their primaries in Virginia’s 7th and 10th Congressional Districts. Both districts are held by Republicans but are on Democrats radar for the fall, with the 10th being one of their top targets. Former CIA agent Abigail Spanberger won Democrats’ nomination for Virginia’s 7th District and State Sen. Jennifer Wexton beat a crowded field for the 10th. 

Republican Shion Fenty, an administrative assistant, was the rare Virginia woman to lose her primary to a man. She lost to evangelical pastor Ryan McAdams for the GOP nomination for Virginia’s 4th Congressional District.

In Nevada, Rep. Jacky Rosen easily secured the Democratic nomination for Senate. Susie Lee, an education advocate, won her crowded primary for the 3rd Congressional District by a majority of the vote.

But it wasn't just Democratic women who won. Arrington beat incumbent Sanford for the GOP nomination in South Carolina.

Tuesday's results weren't the first example of Democratic women succeeding this primary season. From Pennsylvania to New Mexico and Kentucky to Nebraska, female candidates, particularly Democrats, have been winning their primaries.

a couple of people that are talking to each other: Maine Attorney General Janet Mills, left, who is one of seven Democrats facing off in a gubernatorial primary, greets voters outside a polling place, Tuesday, June 12, 2018, in Portland, Maine. The election is the first statewide primary to utilize ranked-choice voting. © David Sharp, AP Maine Attorney General Janet Mills, left, who is one of seven Democrats facing off in a gubernatorial primary, greets voters outside a polling place, Tuesday, June 12, 2018, in Portland, Maine. The election is the first statewide primary to utilize ranked-choice voting.

New voting systems still a guess

Like we found in California with its new system, there's still much to be determined about new voting systems. Maine voters tried Instant Runoff Voting for the first time Tuesday, and at the same time they voted on whether to keep the system.

Under Instant Runoff Voting, first-choice votes are counted and, if no candidate gets over 50 percent, the candidate with the lowest number of votes is removed from the race. Those who gave that candidate their first-choice pick have their votes redirected to their second choice. The process is repeated until a candidate has a majority of the vote and is declared the winner.  

Mainers voted in 2016 to start using the service. Voters went back to the polls Tuesday to determine if they would keep using it. 

But as of early Wednesday morning, many of the key results in the state had yet to come in. 

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